Beyond the End of the World: My Time on an Offshore Oil Platform
Beyond the End of the World: My Time on an Offshore Oil Platform
Beyond the End of the World: My Time on an Offshore Oil Platform

 

IN 2005, SEEKING ADVENTURE and the solitude of pilgrimage, I bicycled from my hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, to an Orthodox Christian monastery in West Virginia, where I stayed for three months. From there I continued on to my uncle’s apartment just outside New Orleans. Low on cash, I filled out job applications until, three weeks later, I heard back from one. My uncle drove me to Venice, Louisiana, the southernmost point of the state, affectionately called by Louisianans “the end of the world.” He dropped me off at 4 AM, and I waited for a helicopter to take me still further, past marshes and grassy wetlands, to an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read more here at the Harvard Divinity Bulletin website.


 

This essay is part of a larger book-length project on pilgrimage and modern monasticism.

Copyright Harvard Divinity Bulletin

 


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